Data Curation &
Publication User Guide

 

 

Experimental

 

 

1. Create a Project

You can start a project at the very beginning of its lifespan, upload and curate data incrementally, then publish sets of data at your convenience.

Projects exist in the Data Depot. Click the Add button in the upper lefthand corner and select New Project.

A window will appear that asks for some general metadata on your project. The more you populate this window, the easier it will be for others to search for and discover your project later when you decide to publish.

Project Type indicates whether your project is Experimental, Simulation, Hybrid Simulation, or Other. If you select anything except Experimental, go to the top of this guide and select the tab that correlates to your Project Type.

When you are finished, click Save Project in the lower right hand corner and your new project will be created.

To learn how to move files into your project, visit our Getting Started guide.


 

 

2. Add an Experiment

To add an experiment, click Manage Experiments, then click Add Experiment.

A form will appear asking you for metadata on your experiment. You need to fill out each piece of metadata initially, but you can come back and edit later. Make sure your description could be understood by all types of researchers.

Click Save Experiment and you will see your experiment listed above.


 

 

3. Create Categories

Click Add Category at the bottom of the Manage Experiments window. A form will appear asking for a title and description of each category you create.

Categories contain groups of similar files and folders. How you conceptualize your experiment will determine how you create your categories.

Event categories are unique occurrences during which data is generated. An experiment can have one or more events.

Model Configuration categories have information and files corresponding to the stage of planning and designing an experiment.

Sensor Information categories have information and files about the sensor instrumentation used in a particular model configuration to conduct one or more event.

Report categories contain written accounts made to convey information about an experiment.

Analysis categories contain tables, graphs, visualizations, Jupiter Notebooks or other types of graphical or text representations of the analysis results.


 

 

4. Relate Categories in a Tree Structure

When you add your experiment in step 2, its title will appear below as the root of a tree in the same Manage Experiments window.

When you add categories in step 3, they will appear in drop-down selections hanging on branches. You won’t see dropdowns for Sensor Information or Event categories initially, but they will appear after you hang the Model Configuration category. This ensures that you hang your categories in the proper order: Model Configuration, Sensor Information, Event. If you have multiple Events per Model/Sensor pair, you can reorder them using the up & down arrows.

Reports are attached to the entire experiment at the root of the tree.

Analyses appear below, separate from the experiment, so they can be published independently.


 

 

5. Assign Categories to Files

To indicate which files belong in which categories, select files (use shift or control for multiple selections), then click the Categorize button in the toolbar above.

A window will appear with the files you selected listed above. The categories you created in step 3 appear in your inventory. Select which category the files belong to by clicking the hollow, colored box by the category name, then click Assign to Files. If you assign a category to a folder, everything within will inherit the category of the folder. Repeat this process for all categories.

Unassign Categories from files by clicking the colored-in box of the category your files are currently assigned, then the box will turn hollow to indicate it is deselected. Now click Assign to Files and the category will be unassigned.

Delete a Category by first unassigning the category from any files (see above). Then select the category from your inventory and click Delete Category.

You can also choose individual descriptions for each file from a list, or fill out your own custom description. This is optional, but it helps your project be discovered once published.


 

 

6. Add Team Members & Assign Authorship

Your project is a collaborative space for you and your team to work together. To give others access to the project, click Manage Team Members.

You can add and remove Co-PIs or team members by entering their email or name into the Add new collaborator fields. This way you can account for researchers coming and going If a project spans many years. Currently, only those with DesignSafe accounts can be added to a project.

Click the arrow underneath Assign Authorship by each team member to expand a list of experiments within the project. Then, specify which experiments they authored by clicking the box next to the experiment’s title.

Any changes made in the Manage Experiments window take effect when you click Save Collaborator Settings.


 

 

7. Preview Your Publication

All of the curation work is done in the Working Directory, while the Publication Preview lets you examine the layout of your publication to give you a peace of mind about how your work will appear to other researchers once published.

Look through the Publication Preview early and often to catch any mistakes. If you are working collaboratively with others, this is a good way to proofread changes they make.


 

 

8. Publish Your Work

When you are satisfied with how your work is curated and wish to publish and recieve a DOI, click Prepare to Publish in the Publication Preview.

A DOI, Digital Object Identifier is a global, unique, persistent identifier that is permanently related to the citation information of your published dataset. Having a DOI means that over time users will always be able to locate your dataset. In addition, the citation information including the DOI, is exposed to web indexers and harvesters so that your publication is easily discovered on the Internet. Once the datasets have a permanent citation status, they cannot be modified in content but they can be versioned. Please, review your dataset carefully before publishing.

There are 4 stages in the publication process: Selection, Review, Metadata, and Agreement.

In Selection, choose which portion of your project you want to publish. This could be one experiment, multiple experiments, select files from an experiment, or just an analysis. Each experiment published will receive its own DOI.

In Review, look over how your publication will appear with only the files you selected in the previous step.

In Metadata, proofread your metadata for any typos and fill in anything missing that is required for publication. You can also arrange the team members of your project in a particular order using the up & down arrows by their names.

In Agreement, select a license that best fits your data and agree that there is no turning back once your work is published.

Finally, click Request DOI & Publish to publish your work.

 

Simulation

 

 

1. Create a Project

You can start a project at the very beginning of its lifespan, upload and curate data incrementally, then publish sets of data at your convenience.

Projects exist in the Data Depot. Click the Add button in the upper lefthand corner and select New Project.

A window will appear that asks for some general metadata on your project. The more you populate this window, the easier it will be for others to search for and discover your project later when you decide to publish.

Project Type indicates whether your project is Experimental, Simulation, Hybrid Simulation, or Other. If you select anything except Simulation, go to the top of this guide and select the tab that correlates to your Project Type.

When you are finished, click Save Project in the lower righthand corner and your new project will be created.

To learn how to move files into your project, visit our Getting Started guide.


 

 

2. Add a Simulation

To add a simulation, click Manage Simulations, then click Add Simulation.

A form will appear asking you for metadata on your simulation. You need to fill out each piece of metadata initially, but you can come back and edit later. Make sure your description could be understood by all types of researchers.

Click Save Simulation and you will see it listed above.


 

 

3. Create Categories

Click Add Category at the bottom of the Manage Simulations window. A form will appear asking for a title and description of each category you create.

Categories contain groups of similar files and folders. How you conceptualize your simulation will determine how you create your categories.

Simulation Model categories contain all the information corresponding to the stage of planning and designing a simulation.

Simulation Input categories contain files with the forces for which a system is analyzed.

Simulation Output categories contain the results of a simulation.

Report categories contain written accounts made to convey information about a simulation.

Analysis categories contain tables, graphs, visualizations, Jupiter Notebooks or other types of graphical or text representations of the analysis results.


 

 

4. Relate Categories in a Tree Structure

When you add your simulation in step 2, its title will appear below as the root of a tree in the same Manage Simulations window.

When you add categories in step 3, they will appear in drop-down selections hanging on branches. You won’t see dropdowns for Simulation Input or Simulation Output categories initially, but they will appear after you hang the Simulation Model category. This ensures that you hang your categories in the proper order: Simulation Model, Simulation Input, Simulation Output.

Reports can be added in 2 places: At the root of a simulation or at a Simulation Output.

Analyses can be attached in 3 places: At the root of a simulation, at a Simulation Output, or separate from a simulation so they can be published independently.


 

 

5. Assign Categories to Files

To indicate which files belong in which categories, select files (use shift or control for multiple selections), then click the Categorize button in the toolbar above.

A window will appear with the files you selected listed above. The categories you created in step 3 appear in your inventory. Select which category the files belong to by clicking the hollow, colored box by the category name, then click Assign to Files. If you assign a category to a folder, everything within will inherit the category of the folder. Repeat this process for all categories.

Undo Category assignments by clicking the colored-in box of the category your files are currently assigned, then the box will turn hollow to indicate it is deselected. Now click Assign to Files and the category will be unassigned.

Delete a Category by first unassigning the category from any files (see above). Then select the category from your inventory and click Delete Category.


 

 

6. Add Team Members & Assign Authorship

Your project is a collaborative space for you and your team to work together. To give others access to the project, click Manage Team Members.

You can add and remove Co-PIs or team members by entering their email or name into the Add new collaborator fields. This way you can account for researchers coming and going If a project spans many years. Currently, only those with DesignSafe accounts can be added to a project.

Click the arrow underneath Assign Authorship by each team member to expand a list of simulations within the project. Then specify which simulations they authored by clicking the box next to the simulation’s title.

Any changes made in the Manage Team Members window take effect when you click Save Collaborator Settings.


 

 

7. Preview Your Publication

All of the curation work is done in the Working Directory, while the Publication Preview lets you examine the layout of your publication to give you a peace of mind about how your work will appear to other researchers once published.

Look through the Publication Preview early and often to catch any mistakes. If you are working collaboratively with others, this is a good way to proofread changes they make.


 

 

8. Publish Your Work

When you are satisfied with how your work is curated and wish to publish and recieve a DOI, click Prepare to Publish in the Publication Preview.

A DOI, Digital Object Identifier is a global, unique, persistent identifier that is permanently related to the citation information of your published dataset. Having a DOI means that over time users will always be able to locate your dataset. In addition, the citation information including the DOI, is exposed to web indexers and harvesters so that your publication is easily discovered on the Internet. Once the datasets have a permanent citation status, they cannot be modified in content but they can be versioned. Please, review your dataset carefully before publishing.

There are 4 stages in the publication process: Selection, Review, Metadata, and Agreement.

In Selection, choose which portion of your project you want to publish. This could be one simulation, multiple simulations, select files from a simulation, or just an analysis. Each simulation published will receive its own DOI.

In Review, look over how your publication will appear with only the files you selected in the previous step.

In Metadata, proofread your metadata for any typos and fill in anything missing that is required for publication. You can also arrange the team members of your project in a particular order using the up & down arrows by their names.

In Agreement, select a license that best fits your data and agree that there is no turning back once your work is published.

Finally, click Request DOI & Publish to publish your work.

 

Other

 

 

1. Create a Project

‘Other’ is for publishing files that are not Experimental, Simulation, or Hybrid Simulation.

Projects exist in the Data Depot. Click the Add button in the upper lefthand corner and select New Project.

A window will appear that asks for some general metadata on your project. The more you populate this window, the easier it will be for others to search for and discover your project later when you decide to publish.

Project Type indicates whether your project is Experimental, Simulation, Hybrid Simulation, or Other. If you select anything except Other, go to the top of this guide and select the tab that correlates to your Project Type.

When you are finished, click Save Project in the lower righthand corner and your new project will be created.

To learn how to move files into your project, visit our Getting Started guide.


 

 

2. Add Team Members

Your project is a collaborative space for you and your team to work together. To give others access to the project, click Manage Team Members.

You can add and remove Co-PIs or team members by entering their email or name into the Add new collaborator fields. This way you can account for researchers coming and going If a project spans many years. Currently, only those with DesignSafe accounts can be added to a project.

Any changes made in the Manage Team Members window take effect when you click Save Collaborator Settings.


 

 

3. Preview Your Publication

All of the work adding files, metadata, and team members is done in the Working Directory, while the Publication Preview lets you examine the layout of your publication to give you a peace of mind about how your work will appear to other researchers once published.

Look through the Publication Preview early and often to catch any mistakes. If you are working collaboratively with others, this is a good way to proofread changes they make.


 

 

4. Publish Your Work

When you are satisfied with your work and wish to publish it and recieve a DOI, click Prepare to Publish in the Publication Preview.

A DOI, Digital Object Identifier is a global, unique, persistent identifier that is permanently related to the citation information of your published dataset. Having a DOI means that over time users will always be able to locate your dataset. In addition, the citation information including the DOI, is exposed to web indexers and harvesters so that your publication is easily discovered on the Internet. Once the datasets have a permanent citation status, they cannot be modified in content but they can be versioned. Please, review your dataset carefully before publishing.

There are 4 stages in the publication process: Selection, Review, Metadata, and Agreement.

In Selection, choose which files of your project you want to publish. This feature is not currently implemented. For now, you can skip this step.

In Review, look over how your publication will appear once published one last time.

In Metadata, proofread your metadata for any typos and fill in anything missing that is required for publication. You can also arrange the team members of your project in a particular order using the up & down arrows by their names.

In Agreement, select a license that best fits your data and agree that there is no turning back once your work is published.

Finally, click Request DOI & Publish to publish your work.